Nevadans Call On Senator Reid To Act

Posted by Brian Patrick on

FYI -

While job creators in Nevada are calling for an end to uncertainty and burdensome regulations, Senator Reid is sitting on 15 House-passed bipartisan jobs bills that would help his home state, which is struggling with an unemployment rate of 13.4%. When will Senator Reid listen to Nevadans and allow the Senate to act on these bipartisan jobs bills?

 • Pezonella Associates is a 35-year-old company that tests soil composition before construction projects begin. "We grab samples and bring them back to our lab, here." Over the last ten years, Ray Pezonella says he's seen regulations grow exponentially. And that's something he says makes it tough, when employing 25 to 35 people. "The federal government came in and took a look at some of our nuclear gauges that we use for testing soil. It's probably cost me $10-20,000 just dealing with regulations...That's way more than we used to spend. You can employ people for that kind of money."

• Randi Thompson [State Director of the NFIB] says, "The government needs to get out of the way because there's so much uncertainty. These guys don't want to hire any more folks because they don't know what the regulations are. They don't know what the tax structure is."

• The NFIB says businesses are spending more money than ever with 4,000 more regulations than three years ago.
 

Gov't Regulations Hurting Nevada Business?
KTVN – Reno, NV
Paul Nelson
October 25, 2011

 The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) is launching a statewide coalition, hoping to cut back on some of the red tape that goes along with running a business which they say threatens our economic growth.

 

The group says about ten federal regulations are put in place every week. And while those regulations are supposed to protect employees and possibly even residents, some say it is hurting Nevada businesses.

Pezonella Associates is a 35-year-old company that tests soil composition before construction projects begin. "We grab samples and bring them back to our lab, here."

Over the last ten years, Ray Pezonella says he's seen regulations grow exponentially.

And that's something he says makes it tough, when employing 25 to 35 people. "The federal government came in and took a look at some of our nuclear gauges that we use for testing soil. It's probably cost me $10-20,000 just dealing with regulations...That's way more than we used to spend. You can employ people for that kind of money."

Randi Thompson says, "The government needs to get out of the way because there's so much uncertainty. These guys don't want to hire any more folks because they don't know what the regulations are. They don't know what the tax structure is."

The NFIB says businesses are spending more money than ever with 4,000 more regulations than three years ago.

But businesses are also effected with time, paperwork, and fines. "Just last week, Nevada OSHA was told that they have to increase their fine rate from 22% to 50%. Now, no justification for that except that they're obviously needing more money for the federal government."

Pezonella's company recently did some work in California, where fuel taxes are higher.

They forgot to log that trip, so the DMV audited them - a process that took a whole day for him and his accountant to sort through. "I got a fine for $8.99. The fine doesn't bother me. The $8.99. What does bother me is the time spent for them to go through the audit."

Here at home, the Nevada Department of Business and Industry says they are reviewing their regulations, hoping to ease the burden some of these businesses face.

"We are getting a number of businesses calling us and we're working with them on a day-to-day basis to see how we can remove these roadblocks," says Ashtok Mirchandani.

And removing those roadblocks, is really all some small business owners want, saying some regulations are necessary. "I think if we work together to make sure that we're following certain guidelines to protect the employees, to protect the community. I think those are good things," says Pezonella.@

The Nevada Department of Business and Industry says they are launching a small business advocacy website, which will give business owners a chance to voice their concerns about certain regulations.

They also say they are reviewing the state's current regulations and plan to submit their findings to the governor in January.
 





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